WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN THE OTHER GUY BREACHES YOUR CONTRACT

WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN THE OTHER GUY BREACHES YOUR CONTRACT

When the other side breaches its contract with you, what are your legal remedies? There are three. Breach of contract, rescission and specific performance. Which one or ones are available to you depend on circumstances and the value of the subject of the contract.
Breach of Contract
The contract you signed to buy the car said the car had 30,000 miles. It turns out the car has 45,000. This is not enough of a discrepancy to want to unload the car, but it does mean the car has less value than you paid for. Or your company buys 1000 widgets. 90 of them are defective and unusable. There is no point in sending back all 1000, but you want to be compensated for the 90 bad ones. In short, situations where you don’t want to repudiate the whole contract, but you want to be compensated to the extent the other side fell short on some portion of its promised performance.
Your remedy is breach of contract. What can you recover? The value of the defective items, interest if it applies, consequential damages (like the costs of shipping back the 90 bad widgets and possibly lost profits), reasonable attorney’s fees and court costs. You cannot recover for any emotional distress or inconvenience caused by the whole incident.
Rescission
Let’s say the car you bought which you thought had 30,000 miles actually has 100,000 miles. Now the discrepancy is so great that you effectively received an entirely different car than you thought you were buying. You don’t want money for the difference: you want the car returned to the seller and all your money returned. Or let’s say there are 600 faulty widgets, you were buying them to resell to a regular buyer, but that buyer refuses to receive lots of less than 500. Effectively, the 1000 widgets are useless to you. You want them all sent back and all your money returned.
This total repudiation of the contract is called rescission. Because the remedy is more extreme than breach of contract, you will have to show the court that the value of the deal has been completely or almost completely destroyed for you. If you win, you get back all your money, minus any damage you may have done to the car or widgets, plus interest if it has been a while, consequential damages, reasonable attorney’s fees and court costs.
Specific Performance
Let’s say you ordered 1000 widgets, but the seller, citing some excuse, only provides you with 400. You still need 500 at least to satisfy your buyer. You don’t want to just rescind because that would not enable you to satisfy your buyer. Rather, you want to force your seller to provide you with the other 600 widgets.
What you want is specific performance. Essentially, you are asking the court to issue an order forcing the other side to fully perform. In addition, you can get your consequential damages (which may or may not include costs incurred with your buyer) along with reasonable attorney’s fees and costs.
Understand that this is a very elementary explanation. Do not try to pursue any of these claims without a lawyer. The short term savings of doing it yourself will undoubtedly result in a much larger loss in the long term when you lose.

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